Foundation Facials: Benefits, Risks, Cost, and More

Asian woman getting lifting anti-ageing, face massage and skincare by electroporation facial therapy aesthetic cosmetology

Image Source: Getty / VichienPetchmai

  • “Foundation facials” are trending on TikTok.
  • The treatment involves microneedling semipermanent makeup into the skin.
  • An aesthetician breaks down the facial as well as the cost and risks associated with the treatment.

At this point, we will assume you spend as much time on TikTok as we do. If so, your For You page may have provided you with the now-viral video of a person receiving a “foundation facial.”

In the clip, which has been viewed more than 10 million times, aesthetician @traciafanclub, is seen applying what looks like a foundation onto someone’s skin. The video, captioned “foundation facial,” promptly blew up with comments from people asking to see the finished product, requesting clarification on the technique, and wondering if the results are permanent.

What exactly is this treatment, and what does it entail? Rachel Roff, aesthetician and founder of Urban Skin Rx, details how foundation facials work, as well as the risks associated with the procedure.

What Is a Foundation Facial?

“Foundation facials are a microneedling treatment that inserts BB cream in the skin,” Roff tells POPSUGAR. “Basically, it’s a semipermanent foundation that lasts quite a few months.”

The best candidates for this procedure are people who want to even out their skin tones and want a more “perfected” canvas. People with melasma or redness from pimple scars could find foundation facials helpful.

The Benefits of Foundation Facials

This procedure is basically like getting permanent makeup etched on, which would ideally reduce your getting-ready time in the mornings — it’s like the ultimate colour corrector. “Foundation facials even out the skin tone and hide minor imperfections,” Roff says. “In addition, it’s great for those that struggle with redness and broken capillaries.”

Another plus is how long you’ll see results. “The effects of a foundation facial can last anywhere from six to 12 months,” Roff says.

What Happens During a “Foundation Facial”?

@traciafanclub

foundation facial

♬ Watch This (ARIZONATEARS Pluggnb Remix) – Lil Uzi Vert & sped up nightcore & ARIZONATEARS

Foundation facials are similar to getting microneedling. “The process involves rolling tiny needles over the face, which allows for deeper penetration of serums, and also increases the skin’s production of collagen and elastin,” Roff says. “Some could have some downtime for about a week, and redness alongside some swelling is normal.”

The Risks of Foundation Facials

As with any beauty treatment, some risks can accompany foundation facials. “There are already minor risks associated with the microneedling technique, and we don’t know how these pigments will interact with the skin,” Roff says. “Infections, allergic reactions, scarring, and more are all possible side effects of getting this treatment.”

Additionally, if you have certain skin conditions, you may not want to get the facial. “If you have inflammatory skin issues like eczema, acne, or psoriasis, you should avoid this treatment,” Roff says. Remember this procedure should be done by a professional. “This technique requires a professional microneedling tool and pigmented formula,” Roff says. “You can’t just use your home microneedling device with your favourite foundation. That’s an infection waiting to happen.”

Alongside a pretty steep price tag (foundation facials can cost anywhere from $400 to $700 for two treatments), another downside is that it’s not an inclusive treatment yet. “Shade ranges are very limited, so only fair to lightly tanned skin tones are candidates,” Roff says.

Foundation facials are pretty controversial, but as with all beauty treatments, what you do to your face and body is your decision alone. Should you choose to get the procedure done, be sure to go to a professional who is well-versed in the technique and can answer all questions.


Read more here: Source link