Tag: melanoma

A Clinical and Immunohistochemical Study

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma is the most common type of lymphoma in Egypt with an unfavorable prognosis. The tumor microenvironment is rich in immune response either T cells or macrophages. The current study is aimed at testing CD4, CD8, CD68, and MMP9 immunohistochemistry of DLBCL activities with the prognosis…

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Immune-related Prognostic Genes of ccRCC

Introduction Kidney cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed tumors around the globe.1 According to the statistics from the World Health Organization, annually, there are more than 140,000 RCC-related deaths.2 ccRCC is the most typical subtype of kidney cancer and contributes to the majority of kidney cancer-related deaths.3,4 Until…

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The Identification of Prognostic and Metastatic Alternative Splicing in Skin Cutaneous Melanoma

Skin cutaneous melanoma (SKCM) is a type of highly invasive cancer originated from melanocytes. It is reported that aberrant alternative splicing (AS) plays an important role in the neoplasia and metastasis of many types of cancer. Therefore, we investigated whether ASEs of pre-RNA have such an influence on the prognosis…

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In Brief This Week: SkylineDx, TTC Oncology, LianBio

NEW YORK –  SkylineDx said this week that it has received a capital investment of undisclosed amount from US-based investment and advisory firm Novalis LifeSciences and from Netherlands-based Van Herk Investments. SkylineDx noted it is at a “critical growth stage,” with its first products introduced in the US. Its dermatology…

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Science snapshots from Berkeley Lab

image: 3D image of melanin in a zebrafish sample captured by micro-computed tomography. view more  Credit: Spencer R. Katz and Daniel J. Vanselow, Penn State College of Medicine) Adapted from a UC Berkeley news release To date, CRISPR enzymes have been used to edit the genomes of one type of cell…

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Hypoxic Characteristic Genes Predict Response to Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma

This article was originally published here Front Cell Dev Biol. 2021 Nov 25;9:762478. doi: 10.3389/fcell.2021.762478. eCollection 2021. ABSTRACT Objective: Resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) has been a massive obstacle to ICI treatment in metastatic urothelial carcinoma (MUC). Recently, increasing evidence indicates the clinical importance of the association between hypoxia…

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Frontiers | The cGAS-STING Pathway: A Promising Immunotherapy Target

Introduction Invaded by exogenous or endogenous pathogens, the host immune system will be activated accordingly to resist harm and maintain homeostasis, which includes innate immunity and adaptive immunity. As the first line of host immune defense, innate immunity plays a critical role in recognizing extracellular and intracellular pathogens (1, 2)….

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Non-genetic determinants of malignant clonal fitness at single-cell resolution

1. Turajlic, S., Sottoriva, A., Graham, T. & Swanton, C. Resolving genetic heterogeneity in cancer. Nat. Rev. Genet. 20, 404–416 (2019). CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar  2. Marine, J. C., Dawson, S. J. & Dawson, M. A. Non-genetic mechanisms of therapeutic resistance in cancer. Nat. Rev. Cancer 20, 743–756 (2020). CAS …

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Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Bioinformatics – Turajlic Lab at The Francis Crick Institute

Location: The Francis Crick Institute, Midland Road, London Contract: Fixed Term (3 years), Full time Short summary Dr Samra Turajlic is a Clinician Scientist with clinical practice in renal cell cancer and melanoma and the programme reflects emerging clinical questions tackled through a combination of cutting-edge methods. The overall aim of the…

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Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Bioinformatics – Turajlic lab job with The Francis Crick Institute

Reports to: Samra Turajlic [C] Job Description: Project summary An exciting opportunity to be part of a pioneering biomedical research institute, dedicated to innovation and science, in the laboratory of Samra Turajlic (Cancer Dynamics, www.crick.ac.uk/research/labs/samra-turajlic). We are seeking a highly collaborative and self-motivated post-doctoral bioinformatician to work within our comprehensive…

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IRE combined with toripalimab versus IRE alone for LAPC

Introduction Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal gastrointestinal disease with increasing morbidity, which also has a growing impact on cancer-specific mortality worldwide.1 Nearly 40% of all PDAC cases are localized to the pancreas and characterized with the involvement of major vascular structures, leading to unresectable disease without metastases detected…

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How to access WGS files on TCGA for melanoma/SKCM

How to access WGS files on TCGA for melanoma/SKCM 0 I was trying to find WGS files for TCGA-SKCM so I can run WGS files through our pipeline and search for circular DNA elements in melanoma samples. However, looking on the TCGA website for this type of cancer, it’s unclear…

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MYO10 drives genomic instability and inflammation in cancer

INTRODUCTION Genomic instability often refers to the existence of a variety of DNA alterations, ranging from single nucleotide changes (such as base substitution, deletion, and insertion) to chromosomal rearrangements (e.g., gain or loss of a segment or the whole chromosome) (1). Loss of genome stability can lead to early onset…

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Investors Pour $360 Million into Cutting-Edge Biotechs

After a quiet Labor Day weekend, four companies announced successful Series B raises to propel pipeline candidates further down the track toward clinical studies and approvals.   Cambridge-based Obsidian Therapeutics comes in with the highest raise of $115 million for its engineered cell and gene therapies. Led by TCGX, the round attracted both…

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Oncogene Concatenated Enriched Amplicon Nanopore Sequencing for rapid, accurate, and affordable somatic mutation detection | Genome Biology

Stochastic Amplicon Ligation. DNA samples for oncology sequencing are typically extracted from FFPE tissues and can have average lengths of less than 500 nt due to accumulated chemical damage [18]. We developed the Stochastic Amplicon Ligation (SAL) method to enzymatically concatenate many short DNA molecules together to utilize the long-read…

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Modification of endoglin-targeting nanoliposomes | IJN

Introduction Today, malignant tumors (cancer) still severely imperil human health and cause millions of global mortality rates.1,2 Deep-seated solid tumors are challenging to cure by most therapeutic tools, mainly blamed on the complex tumor microenvironment (TME).3,4 Adoptive cell therapy (ACT), as one of the effective immunotherapeutic means for cancer treatment,…

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Humane Genomics is 3D-printing oncolytic viruses to treat rare cancers

Oncolytic viruses have long held promise for cancer treatment, but their first generation hasn’t quite delivered. Armed with new tools and technology—including 3D printing—Humane Genomics is part of a wave of companies working on oncolytic viruses 2.0.  The only FDA-approved oncolytic virus is Amgen’s Imlygic, which scored a nod in…

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Humanized Mice: Generation, Advantages and Applications

Mice are commonly used as models of human disease, helping scientists to understand the workings of complex pathologies and develop safe and efficacious drugs. It is now possible to create a range of genetically engineered mouse models, including humanized, knock-in and knock-out models, that can be used to further advance…

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