Tag: ScienceDaily

Researchers develop new machete technique to slice into cancer genome and study copy number alterations — ScienceDaily

MACHETE is a new CRISPR-based technique developed by researchers at the Sloan Kettering Institute (SKI) to study large-scale genetic deletions efficiently in laboratory models. People are already calling it the Machete Paper. Still, lead authors Francisco “Pancho” Barriga and Kaloyan Tsanov of the Sloan Kettering Institute don’t want the name…

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Scientists pinpoint druggable target in aggressive breast cancer — ScienceDaily

Researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have set their sights on a new therapeutic target for an aggressive form of breast cancer with limited treatment options. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in U.S. women, and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a more aggressive and deadly form of…

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A brain mechanism underlying the evolution of anxiety — ScienceDaily

New research using genome editing technology has allowed scientists to create a model and assess a gene mutation associated with neuropsychiatric disorders in humans. The study has revealed how the mutation functions in the brain and affects anxiety and sociality. Monoamine neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine play important roles…

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Common gene used to profile microbial communities — ScienceDaily

Part of a gene is better than none when identifying a species of microbe. But for Rice University computer scientists, part was not nearly enough in their pursuit of a program to identify all the species in a microbiome. Emu, their microbial community profiling software, effectively identifies bacterial species by…

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Impact of DNA mutations on lifelong blood cell production uncovered — ScienceDaily

New research has uncovered how genetic mutations hijack the production of blood cells in different periods of life. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and collaborators show how these changes relate to ageing and the development of age-related diseases, including…

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Novel supramolecular CRISPR-Cas9 carrier enables more efficient genome editing — ScienceDaily

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their accompanying protein, CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), made international headlines a few years ago as a game-changing genome editing system. Consisting of Cas9 and strand of genetic material known as a single-guide RNA (sgRNA), the system can target specific regions of DNA…

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How immune cells enter tissue — ScienceDaily

To get to the places where they are needed, immune cells not only squeeze through tiny pores. They even overcome wall-like barriers of tightly packed cells. Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) have now discovered that cell division is key to their success. Together with other…

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Scientists Develop New Tool for Investigating the Microbiome’s Befuddling Variety

A novel approach for investigating the microbiome in extraordinary detail has been described by scientists. In comparison to previous methodologies, the technology is simpler and easier to apply. The researchers exhibit an increased capacity to detect physiologically relevant factors such as a subject’s age and sex depending on microbial samples…

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From liquid to solid to drive development – ScienceDaily

The term ‘phase transition’ might initially conjure up images of ice melting or water vapour condensing on a cold glass. In biology, phase transition plays a role in processes such as lipid bilayer formation or the spontaneous de-mixing of protein droplets. In a recent paper published in Cell, the Ephrussi…

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Nanofountain Probe Electroporation system enables efficient engineering of stem cells — ScienceDaily

One of the ultimate goals of medical science is to develop personalized disease diagnostics and therapeutics. With a patient’s genetic information, doctors could tailor treatments to individuals, leading to safer and more effective care. Recent work from a team of Northwestern Engineering researchers has moved the field closer to realizing…

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Human induced pluripotent stem cells improve visual acuity, vascular health — ScienceDaily

Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the University of Alabama at Birmingham and five other institutions, are investigating novel regenerative medicine approaches to better manage vascular health complications from type 2 diabetes that could someday support blood vessel repair in the eye among diabetic patients with…

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The Information Age needs a new data storage powerhouse. With an expanded molecular alphabet and a 21st century twist, DNA may just fit the bill. — ScienceDaily

Imagine Bach’s “Cello Suite No. 1” played on a strand of DNA. This scenario is not as impossible as it seems. Too small to withstand a rhythmic strum or sliding bowstring, DNA is a powerhouse for storing audio files and all kinds of other media. “DNA is nature’s original data…

Continue Reading The Information Age needs a new data storage powerhouse. With an expanded molecular alphabet and a 21st century twist, DNA may just fit the bill. — ScienceDaily

What’s happening in the depths of distant worlds? Discovery could have revolutionary implications for how we think about the dynamics of exoplanet interiors – ScienceDaily

What’s happening in the depths of distant worlds? Discovery could have revolutionary implications for how we think about the dynamics of exoplanet interiors – ScienceDaily – Verve times Home Science What’s happening in the depths of distant worlds? Discovery could have revolutionary implications for how we think about the dynamics…

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27 million ancestors — ScienceDaily

Researchers from the University of Oxford’s Big Data Institute have taken a major step towards mapping the entirety of genetic relationships among humans: a single genealogy that traces the ancestry of all of us. The study has been published today in Science. The past two decades have seen extraordinary advancements…

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Boosting the efficiency of single-cell RNA sequencing — ScienceDaily

Single-cell RNA sequencing, or “scRNA-seq” for short, is a technique that allows scientists to study the expression of genes in an individual cell within a mixed population — which is virtually how all cells exist in the body’s tissues. Part of a larger family of “single-cell sequencing” techniques, scRNA-seq involves…

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Study illustrates conservation of immune system’s cell death mechanisms originating billions of years ago in single-celled organisms. — ScienceDaily

The human immune system, that marvel of complexity, subtlety, and sophistication, includes a billion-year-old family of proteins used by bacteria to defend themselves against viruses, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and in Israel have discovered. The findings, published online today by the journal Science, are the latest in a growing…

Continue Reading Study illustrates conservation of immune system’s cell death mechanisms originating billions of years ago in single-celled organisms. — ScienceDaily

Immuno-CRISPR assay could help diagnose kidney transplant rejection early on — ScienceDaily

When a patient receives a kidney transplant, doctors carefully monitor them for signs of rejection in several ways, including biopsy. However, this procedure is invasive and can only detect issues at a late stage. Now, researchers reporting in ACS’ Analytical Chemistry have developed a CRISPR-based assay that can sensitively and…

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Doctoral student finds alternative cell option for organs-on-chips — ScienceDaily

Organ-on-a-chip technology has provided a push to discover new drugs for a variety of rare and ignored diseases for which current models either don’t exist or lack precision. In particular, these platforms can include the cells of a patient, thus resulting in patient-specific discovery. As an example, even though sickle…

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New biosensors shine a light on CRISPR gene editing — ScienceDaily

Detecting the activity of CRISPR gene editing tools in organisms with the naked eye and an ultraviolet flashlight is now possible using technology developed at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Scientists demonstrated these real-time detection tools in plants and anticipate their use in animals, bacteria and fungi…

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Burrowing snakes have far worse eyesight than their ancestors — ScienceDaily

The ancestor of all living snakes probably had substantially better vision than present-day burrowing snakes, according to new research. An international team of scientists — led by the Natural History Museum and the University of Plymouth — carried out the first detailed analysis of gene sequence data for any species…

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Protein interaction induces inflammation in the brain — ScienceDaily

Just as a home security system can alert a homeowner to the presence of an intruder, a protein called polyglutamine binding protein-1 (PQBP1) found in brain cells can alert the body to the presence of “intruding” viruses like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Now, researchers in Japan have shed new light…

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Stem cell study paves way for manufacturing cultured meat — ScienceDaily

Scientists have for the first time obtained stem cells from livestock that grow under chemically defined conditions, paving the way for manufacturing cell cultured meat and breeding enhanced livestock. Researchers from the University of Nottingham’s School of Biosciences, together with colleagues at the Universities of Cambridge, Exeter Tokyo and Meiji…

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In mouse study, rewired cells automatically release biologic drug in response to inflammation — ScienceDaily

With a goal of developing rheumatoid arthritis therapies with minimal side effects, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have genetically engineered cells that, when implanted in mice, will deliver a biologic drug in response to inflammation. The engineered cells reduced inflammation and prevented a type of…

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Gene editing could render mosquitoes infertile, reducing disease spread — ScienceDaily

Mosquitoes spread viruses that cause potentially deadly diseases such as Zika, dengue fever and yellow fever. New U.S. Army-funded research uses gene editing to render certain male mosquitoes infertile and slow the spread of these diseases. Researchers at the Army’s Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies and the University of California Santa…

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Mutated enzyme weakens connection between brain cells that help control movement — ScienceDaily

In one type of a rare, inherited genetic disorder that affects control of body movement, scientists have found a mutation in an enzyme impairs communication between neurons and what should be the inherent ability to pick up our pace when we need to run, instead of walk, across the street….

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Genome-editing strategy developed for potential Alzheimer’s disease therapy — ScienceDaily

An international research team led by scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has developed a novel strategy using brain-wide genome-editing technology that can reduce Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathologies in genetically modified AD mouse models. This advanced technology offers immense potential to be translated as a…

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